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Interactions between structured light and matter at the nano-scale I

10:30 Invited talk : Structured surface plasmon polaritons with metasurfaces

Federico Capasso

Harvard University (USA)

Metasurfaces have become a powerful tool to shape surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) beams. I will present new experiments on imaging SPP that have revealed the formation of Cherenkov SPP wakes and demonstrated polarization sensitive light couplers that control the directionality of SPP and lenses which demultiplex focused SPP beams depending on their wavelength and polarization.
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10:50 Invited talk : Infinite anisotropy: An approach to manipulating deep sub-wavelength optical beams

Peter B. Catrysse, Shanhui Fan

Stanford University (USA)

Media with extreme electromagnetic parameters have created significant fundamental and applied interest recently. I discuss our work on infinite anisotropy. I point out opportunities for controlling light at the nano-scale with infinitely anisotropic metamaterials. I show diffraction-free propagation of deep-subwavelength beams. I demonstrate interfaces that are impedance-matched for deep-subwavelength beams and enable reflection-free routing with zero bend radius without diffraction. These behaviors indicate an unprecedented possibility to manipulate deep-subwavelength beams and images using infinite anisotropy.
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11:10 Invited talk : In-situ visualization of intercalation-driven nanoparticle phase transitions using plasmon-EELS

Jennifer A. Dionne

Stanford University (USA)

We observe and measure atomic dipole forces for nanodiamonds (NDs) containing many NV centres, in a liquid environment. While holding the NDs (~150 nm in size) at the focus of classical optical tweezers in liquid, we employ a second laser beam slightly detuned from the dipole transition of the target colour centres and measure dispersive variations in the trap stiffness, due to the resonant forces, of ~10 percent.
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11:30 Invited talk : Tuning the optical response using ultranarrow flat plasmonic gaps.

Ruben Esteban, Javier Aizpurua

Donostia International Physics center DIPC (Spain)

We study theoretically the rich optical response of gap plasmonic antennas supporting both cavity and longitudinal antenna modes. We show how small changes in the exact configuration of the gap can allow to tune the near and far field almost independently, as well as to track subtle morphological changes. We also discuss quantum effects due to tunneling, and the possibility to tune the plasmonic modes of flat-gap chains over a very large spectral range.
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11:50 Invited talk : Interaction of Light with Structured Graphene and other Atomic-Scale Materials

Javier Garcia de Abajo

ICFO (Spain)

The emergence of graphene plasmonics has triggered the search for resonant optical phenomena in other materials that are structured down to the atomic scale, and in particular, alternative 2D crsystals, noble-metal monolayers, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which can be regarded as molecular versions of graphene. We will review recent progress made in the achievement of strong optical tunability in the vis-NIR using plasmons of atomic-scale materials, as well as their potential application for quantum optics, light manipulation, and sensing.
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12:10 Invited talk : Structured light and chiral plasmons

Yuri Gorodetski (1),Aurelien Drezet (2),Konstantin Bliokh (3),Benedikt Stein (4),Nir Shitrit (5),Vladimir Kleiner (5),Erez Hasman (5),Cyriaque Genet (4),Thomas Ebbesen (4)

(1)Ariel University (Israel) , (2)Joseph Fourier University (France) , (3)RIKEN (Japan) , (4)Strasbourg University (France) , (5)Technion (Israel)

We examine, both experimentally and theoretically, an interaction of chiral light with helical nanostructures, milled on both sides of a suspended golden membrane. We analyze the plasmonic near-field distribution and demonstrate the beaming of singular optical mode to the far-field. We show how the interaction of the chiral light with a simple slit may induce unexpected near-field symmetry breaking of plasmonic field and regard it as a plasmonic weak measurement.
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