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Symposium 1: Functional Metastructures and Nanomaterials: Properties, Fabrication and Modeling IX

10:20 Keynote talk : Quantum Photonic Computing

Jeremy O'Brien

University of Bristol (United Kingdom)

Of the various approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation at the single qubit level, while the challenge of entangling interactions between photons can be met via measurement induced non-linearities. However, the real excitement with this architecture is the promise of ultimate manufacturability: All of the components-inc. sources, detectors, filters, switches, delay lines-have been implemented on chip, and increasingly sophisticated integration of these components is being achieved. We will present the opportunities and challenges of a fully integrated photonic quantum computer.
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10:50 Invited talk : Chaotic Light Trapping in Periodic Fiber Arrays

Marina Mariano (1),G. Kozyreff (2),G. Gerling (3),J. Puigdollers (3),P. Romero-Gomez (1),J. Bravo-Abad (4),Jordi Martorell (1)

(1)ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Spain) , (2)ULB (Belgium) , (3)Universitat Politecnica de Catalaunya (Spain) , (4)Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

We implemented a novel light trapping mechanism based on an array of fibers capable of forcing a ninety-degree bending of the incident light. Light rays incident close to the intersection between to adjacent fibers can be trapped in the fiber structure thanks to a chaotic whispering gallery type propagation. When an organic cell is deposited on the backside of the array, sunlight harvesting is largely enhanced leading to a measured increase in photovoltaic cell performance higher than 30 percent.
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11:10 Invited talk : Hybrid Nanophotonic Materials for Enhanced Ultrafast Optical Response and Efficient Photoinduced Charge Separation

Gary Wiederrecht

Argonne National Laboratory (USA)

In this talk I describe the ultrafast response of hybrid nanomaterials of interest for nanoscale optical switching and optical energy conversion. I also describe novel means to visualize, temporally and spatially, photoinduced charge separation at nanoscale interfaces of hybrid materials. The materials and phenomena range from hybrid plasmonic materials with ultrafast hot electron responses, to highly reductive type II core/shell quantum dots that permit efficient separation of charge across the core/shell interface for enhanced opportunities in photoinduced charge separation.
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11:30 Invited talk : Near-fields of Nanoplasmonics Visualized with Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscopy

Aycan Yurtsever

INRS (Canada)

We introduce a novel imaging methodology that can directly map the near-fields of nanoplasmonics with spatiotemporal resolutions that were not possible before. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy enables the direct visualization of laser-induced electric fields as they rise and fall within the duration of the excitation laser pulse (hundreds of femtoseconds) with several nanometers of spatial resolution. We demonstrate this capability by investigating several nanoplasmonic systems, including particle dimers, particle ensembles and standing-wave plasmons at the edges of layered-graphene strips.
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11:50 Invited talk : Hit 'em where they ain't: super-resolution imaging of porous nanomaterials

C. F. Landes

Rice University Department of Chemistry (USA)

We introduce a super-resolution optical imaging technique that relies on probing the porous space within nanomaterials. The method provides sub-diffraction-limited structural information about the material as well as transport dynamics. Pore sizes and diffusion coefficients are better understood compared to diffraction-limited imaging and particle tracking.
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12:10 Invited talk : Multifunctional Materials for Electronics and Photonics

F. Rosei

INRS (Canada)

We demonstrate various strategies to control nanostructure assembly (both organic and inorganic) at the nanoscale. We study, in particular, multifunctional materials, namely materials that exhibit more than one functionality, and structure/property relationships in such systems.
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